CAT CARE HOME PAGE
CATGREETINGS HOME PAGE
TRANSDERMAL MEDICATION
DECLAWING
PET INSURANCE
Other

TRANSDERMAL MEDICATION
Save Up To $30 On All Flea & Tick Products!

  WHAT IS TRANSDERMAL MEDICATION ?

One of the least known about methods of administering medications to your cat is transdermally. Simply put, this is a gel that is applied to a hairless area of your pet (usually in the ear. The ear TIP, NOT the ear canal). Transdermal medications work much the same as a a nicotine "patch" for humans trying to stop smoking. The medication is absorbed through the skin. The obvious advantage is that you don't need to pill your cat, or attempt to sneak it in their food. Some cats just will not allow you to pill them, and even if you do win the battle, it is often traumatizing to them (not to mention you !) Other cats aren't eating, and thus hiding it in their food is not an option.

  We first encountered transdermal meds when our kitty Toonces was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. He was NOT the type to let you pill him, and was far too smart for us to crush the pills and hide them in his food. We found it strange that the vet who's care he was under never mentioned this option. We've heard this from lots of people. Their vet never offers them the option of transdermal meds. One other rather blatant case, was for a severely neurologically impaired cat, who needed to take prednizone daily. Her owner had this ritual of locking the cat in the bathroom, donning full length gardening gloves, and battling the cat until she could pill her. This was a daily upsetting task for both the owner and the cat. The owner had an out of state funeral she had to attend, so asked us to come over and take care of this cat. After watching her go through this extremely difficult ordeal, I asked her why she wasn't using transdermal meds. She had never heard of this, and she said her doctor never mentioned it, full knowing what she went through daily to pill this kitty. Now keep in mind, a good many drugs don't work well this way, but our theory is that since the vet can't compound and sell the prescription himself, adding his/her jacked up price, they'd rather you didn't know about it. A brief aside on that topic, it is almost never a good idea to buy your cats medication from your vet. Vets almost always make a decent profit on medications. Once in a while, fine, but if your pet needs to be on any medication for more than a week or two, ask them to "script" it out to your local pharmacy. It is usually far less expensive. Remember, no matter how good your vet may be, it is still a business, and most vets do make money on prescriptions.

  WHAT MEDICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE ?

In interviewing several vets, and speaking with a few pharmacies that do compounding, the most prescribed transdermal medication is Methimazole (Tapazole), for hyperthyroidism. Several other medications include, Cyproheptadine, an antihistamine, often used as an appetite stimulant, Prednisolone, a steroid, Famotadine (Pepcid) for gastrointesintal problems, Fluoxetine (Prozac), and Amitriptyline, both, for behavioral problems, and Tramadole, a pain reliever, Ciprofloxcin and Amoxicillin, both antibiotics.

  1-800-PetMeds

  HOW TO APPLY:

It is very important that once you have been prescribed a transdermal medication for your cat, that you discuss all details of administering the drug, including application. Application is a pretty easy process. The transdermal gels usually comes in plastic syringes (minus the needle), with markings on the side i.e 1 ml etc. To prevent the human administering the drug from having it absorbed into their own skin, it is necessary to wear a rubber glove or cover your finger with plastic wrap. You must be careful not to let the gel come in direct contact with your own skin. Generally, the gel is simply applied to the inside of the cat's ear tip.

  OTHER COMMENTS:

Most sources/directions did not mention the fact that you should clean your kitty's ear tip every other day or so to reduce any residue that may build up, as it inhibits the absorption of the medication. A paper towel with warm water usually does the trick quite well. One source states that the actual medication is absorbed in about 15 minutes, so if you have small children or other animals, it is wise to separate the kitty for that 15 minute period.

  WHERE TO BUY:

First off remember, your vet must write you a prescription, just like with any other medication. Not all pharmacies offer compounding services, and actually most do not. Below, we have made a listing of pharmacies that we have found on the web. Please note that we are NOT recommending them, just listing them as a service.

ISLAND PHARMACY SERVICE INC:

Located in Wisconsin, they are authorized to fill and ship prescriptions to any state. Phone: 800-328-7060 Web Site: www.islandpharmacy.com

Shop PETCO.com now and find online specials!




|CAT CARE HOME PAGE| |CATGREETINGS HOME PAGE| |TRANSDERMAL MEDICATION| |DECLAWING| |PET INSURANCE| |Other|